One of the major challenges facing the construction industry over the next three years is the lack of skilled personnel available to complete the regeneration of Ireland’s built landscape.

There is an estimated shortage of 112,000 people in the industry, with a particular shortage of experienced architects and engineers at all levels. As well as engineers and architects, skilled craftspeople are desperately needed – the number of skilled craftspeople working in Ireland in 2015 was 48,900, but an additional 36,000 skilled craftspeople (including apprentices) will be needed by 2020. See DKM report.

Over the next few weeks, CIF will be running a series of interviews with returned emigrants who have come home to work in the industry in Ireland – why they left, why they came home and their hopes and fears for the future. Through this we hope to give insight into the expectations they have about working in Ireland, what motivated them to return home, and discover what Ireland and the construction industry can do to attract valuable personnel back to Ireland.

Allyn

One of the major challenges facing the construction industry over the next three years is the lack of skilled personnel available to complete the regeneration of Ireland’s built landscape.

There is an estimated shortage of 112,000 people in the industry, with a particular shortage of experienced architects and engineers at all levels. As well as engineers and architects, skilled craftspeople are desperately needed – the number of skilled craftspeople working in Ireland in 2015 was 48,900, but an additional 36,000 skilled craftspeople (including apprentices) will be needed by 2020. See DKM report.

Over the next few weeks, CIF will be running a series of interviews with returned emigrants who have come home to work in the industry in Ireland – why they left, why they came home and their hopes and fears for the future. Through this we hope to give insight into the expectations they have about working in Ireland, what motivated them to return home, and discover what Ireland and the construction industry can do to attract valuable personnel back to Ireland.

Late last summer Buildstruct, a modern building company with a passion for innovation and creative thinking, was approached to work on its most challenging project to date- a permanent home, made from shipping containers.

Less than eight months later, the project in Dublin’s Ringsend, which will be the first ever permanent structure of its kind in Ireland, is nearing completion.

“We were initially supposed to construct phase one, which consisted of three containers, including the ground floor and all of the associated ground works,” JP McGann of Buildstruct explains. “Then this changed to including the first floor when the client saw the first containers being installed and obviously this changed our schedule, but we were happy to accommodate them as we wanted to see the project closer to completion ourselves.”

JeanetteHeritage Contracting and Conservation of the Built Environment

There is an ever increasing demand for main and specialist heritage contractors who have the competence, i.e. knowledge and skills, to conserve, repair and restore the wide range of heritage structures and sites in Ireland. The success of each project is dependent on the competence, attitude and approach of the contractors who carry out the work. The skills of the traditional craftsmen involved, coupled with effective management of the works programme, are essential elements for the client.

The Register of Heritage Contractors provides an accredited listing of such competent main contractors and specialist contractors in the field of built heritage conservation. The Register is overseen by an independent Board comprised of senior figures from the construction industry, the professions, third level institutions and conservation bodies (including: Construction Industry Federation, Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland, Office of Public Works, The Heritage Council, Irish Georgian Society, Limerick Institute of Technology, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Fingal County Council).

"The best advice I would have for any Irish companies looking to build relationships with Canadian counterparts would be to speak with our office first," says Gerry Mongey Trade Commissioner at the Canadian Embassy in Dublin.

Gerry works on behalf of Canadian companies across a variety of sectors, but always in line with local strengths. Her mandate is to best understand the local market and see where opportunities lie between Ireland and Canada.

"If an Irish company is looking to import a product or service from Canada, has been contacted by a Canadian company and wishes to learn more about that company, is interested in a joint venture or partnership or looking at investing in Canada, I can be the first point of contact and will be pleased to assist and guide as appropriate," Gerry explains.