tom-parlon CIF Director General, Tom Parlon discusses the strong construction levels, infrastructure and housing plans across Ireland and encourages Irish working overseas to consider coming home and be involved in the industry at a very exciting time.

All the signs are that 2017 will be a busy year for the construction industry and this should include Government projects as well as private projects.

Contractors need to be aware as of 9th January 2017 it is mandatory for Contracting Authorities (“CA’s”) to use the revised versions of the Public Works Contracts suite of documents and no further amendments are permitted to same. Therefore contractors should familiarise themselves with the revisions so they can tender properly and operate the project effectively.

 

One of the major challenges facing the construction industry over the next three years is the lack of skilled personnel available to complete the regeneration of Ireland’s built landscape.

There is an estimated shortage of 112,000 people in the industry, with a particular shortage of experienced architects and engineers at all levels. As well as engineers and architects, skilled craftspeople are desperately needed – the number of skilled craftspeople working in Ireland in 2015 was 48,900, but an additional 36,000 skilled craftspeople (including apprentices) will be needed by 2020. See DKM report.

Over the next few weeks, CIF will be running a series of interviews with returned emigrants who have come home to work in the industry in Ireland – why they left, why they came home and their hopes and fears for the future. Through this we hope to give insight into the expectations they have about working in Ireland, what motivated them to return home, and discover what Ireland and the construction industry can do to attract valuable personnel back to Ireland.

Allyn

One of the major challenges facing the construction industry over the next three years is the lack of skilled personnel available to complete the regeneration of Ireland’s built landscape.

There is an estimated shortage of 112,000 people in the industry, with a particular shortage of experienced architects and engineers at all levels. As well as engineers and architects, skilled craftspeople are desperately needed – the number of skilled craftspeople working in Ireland in 2015 was 48,900, but an additional 36,000 skilled craftspeople (including apprentices) will be needed by 2020. See DKM report.

Over the next few weeks, CIF will be running a series of interviews with returned emigrants who have come home to work in the industry in Ireland – why they left, why they came home and their hopes and fears for the future. Through this we hope to give insight into the expectations they have about working in Ireland, what motivated them to return home, and discover what Ireland and the construction industry can do to attract valuable personnel back to Ireland.

Late last summer Buildstruct, a modern building company with a passion for innovation and creative thinking, was approached to work on its most challenging project to date- a permanent home, made from shipping containers.

Less than eight months later, the project in Dublin’s Ringsend, which will be the first ever permanent structure of its kind in Ireland, is nearing completion.

“We were initially supposed to construct phase one, which consisted of three containers, including the ground floor and all of the associated ground works,” JP McGann of Buildstruct explains. “Then this changed to including the first floor when the client saw the first containers being installed and obviously this changed our schedule, but we were happy to accommodate them as we wanted to see the project closer to completion ourselves.”